Seared Pork & Sweet Potatoes Creamy Mustard Sauce

Seared Pork & Sweet Potatoes with Creamy Mustard Sauce: Meat and potatoes, a classic American dinner time staple. But this recipe takes it to the next level by Seared Pork tenderloin medallions until crusty and golden, then topping them with a creamy Dijon mustard sauce. Served alongside mashed sweet potatoes and topped with a peppery arugula salad.

Key to this meal

The reason why I love this dish is its simplicity of flavors. Cooking the pork tenderloin to perfection is key. First you have to pat pork dry before we start working with it. We want to get rid of the moisture in the meat. Slice, tenderloin crosswise, into 1⁄2-inch thick medallions (about 6). Season all over with 1⁄2 teaspoon sea salt and several grinds of pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Add pork and cook until well browned and slightly pink in the center, 2–3 minutes per side. Let the meat rest before you cut into it.

While the meat is resting lets Make the tasty sauce that goes over the pork. Add shallots and 1 teaspoon oil to skillet and cook until shallots are softened and browned. About 1 minute watch closely. Add broth mixture into the skillet. Bring to a simmer, then cook until thickened and reduced to about 1⁄4 cup, 3–4 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in half of the sour cream. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

History and Importance of the Sweet Potato:

Sweet potato history can be traced back to Central and South America. In Central America, domesticated sweet potatoes were present at least 5,000 years ago. They think the first sweet potatoes were grown possibly between the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico and the mouth of the Orinoco River in Venezuela.

The sweet potato was most likely spread by local people to the Caribbean and South America by 2500 B.C.E.

And the sweet potato was brought to central Polynesia around 700 C.E., possibly by Polynesians who had traveled to South America and back, and spread from there across Polynesia to Hawaii and New Zealand.

Finally the sweet potato became a major player in the world food supply in response to a major crop failure, in Fujian province of China in about 1594.

The sweet potato was also introduced to Okinawa, Japan, in the early 1600s. It became a staple in Japan because they were important in preventing famine when rice harvests were poor.

Seared Pork & Sweet Potatoes with Creamy Mustard Sauce

The sweet potato arrived in Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries as a result of Christopher Columbus travels and colonial antics otherwise known as the Columbian exchange. It is mentioned in Elinor Fettiplace’s Receipt Book, a cookbook compiled in England in 1604.

Tips for cooking pork

Dry meat off with a paper towel before trimming to prevent it from slipping around while cutting. Make a cut at one inch intervals through the fat on the edges of steaks and chops to prevent curling during cooking.

Tips for Checking Doneness with Seared Pork:

When pricked, the juices should run clear or have just a very faint pink tint.

Cut into the meat and check meat to see that it is white in color. When cooked to medium doneness there may be slight traces of pink in the middle.

To ensure doneness, check with a meat thermometer. A thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the cut should produce a temperature of 145°F for medium doneness (160°F to 165°F for well done).

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Pork and mashed potato's

Seared Pork & Sweet Potatoes

Yield: 2
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes

Seared Pork & Sweet Potatoes with Creamy Mustard Sauce: Meat and potatoes, a classic American dinner time staple.

Ingredients

  • 2 medium sweet potatoes
  • 3 oz shallot
  • 1 pkt beef broth concentrate
  • 1 ⁄2 oz whole grain mustard
  • 10 oz pork tenderloin
  • 2 oz sour cream
  • 3 oz baby arugula
  • kosher salt & ground pepper
  • olive oil
  • apple cider vinegar (or white wine vinegar)

Instructions

  1. Make sweet potatoes: Peel sweet potatoes. Slice lengthwise, then cut into 1-inch pieces. Place in a medium saucepan and cover by 1-inch with salted water. Cover and bring to a boil. Simmer sweet potatoes, uncovered, until potatoes are tender, about 13 minutes. Drain, then return to saucepan. Cover to keep warm.
  2. Prep vinaigrette: Halve shallot, then peel and finely chop. In a liquid measuring cup, whisk together 1⁄2 cup water, beef broth concentrate, and mustard.
  3. Marinate shallots: In a medium bowl, whisk together 2 tablespoons oil, 1 tablespoon vinegar, and a pinch each salt and pepper. Stir 2 tablespoons shallots into vinaigrette (save rest for step 5) and set aside to marinate.
  4. Cook pork tenderloin: Pat pork dry. Slice, crosswise, into 1⁄2-inch thick medallions (about 6). Season all over with 1⁄2 teaspoon salt and several grinds of pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a medium skillet over medium-high. Add pork and cook until well browned and slightly pink in the center, 2–3 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate and cover to keep warm.
  5. Make sauce: Add remaining shallots and 1 teaspoon oil to skillet and cook until shallots are softened and browned, about 1 minute. Stir broth mixture, then add to skillet. Bring to a simmer, then cook until thickened and reduced to about 1⁄4 cup, 3–4 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in half of the sour cream. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  6. Finish & serve: Return sweet potatoes to medium heat. Add remaining sour cream and 2 tablespoons oil, then mash with a fork or potato masher until creamy. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss arugula with vinaigrette. Serve pork, with sauce spooned over top, alongside salad and mashed sweet potatoes.
Nutrition Information:
Yield: 2 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 498Total Fat: 20gSaturated Fat: 6gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 11gCholesterol: 120mgSodium: 1198mgCarbohydrates: 36gFiber: 7gSugar: 13gProtein: 45g


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